How to Catch Blue Fish

Aboard Party Boat NJ you will either jig for the fish, or fish with bait on a hook.

Jigging

This method of blue fishing works best when there is a large school of blues. Often you will spot the fish chasing bait fish near the surface of the water. The captain looks for birds flying in groups near the water’s surface. This is often a sure sign of a large school of blues. The captain will stop the boat and drift over where the fish are swimming.

Your fishing rod will have a diamond head jig tipped with a green tube and the hook. No bait is used.

The deckhand will show you how to drop your line, with the attached jig, to the bottom and reel as fast as you can until the jig is just at the surface of the water. If you do not hook up with a blue on the first try, you drop your line again and reel as fast as you can until the jig is at the surface. This process repeats until you hook up. Then, be prepared for the battle.

Once a fish is hooked, it is most important to keep your fishing line straight out in front of you. For example, you hook up with the blue and see your line at the back of the boat, but you are at the front of the boat. The crew will yell for you to walk to your fish. As you walk toward the back of the boat, watch all the lines form the rods you pass. It is important not to have your line cross other lines. This means you may walk in front of some people and behind others on your way to your hooked fish. The crew will follow and coach. If you do get caught in other lines (called a tangle), the crew will quickly work to get you out of that tangle and you proceed to our fish and continue to reel it in.

Sometimes the fish will keep swimming away and bring you around the entire boat. The best way to win the battle is to keep following the fish. When you see the fish just near the surface, be carefully that the fish stays in the water until the deckhand puts a gaff ( a pole with a sharp hook on it) in it and brings it on the boat. Do not reel anymore. Leave the fish on the top in the water while you wait for the gaff.

Yay! Now you caught a fish. Get that line and toss it in the deep blue sea again and reel, reel, reel as fast as you can and catch another, and another.

Bait fishing

When large schools of blue fish are not easily spotted, the captain will travel to a spot where the blues are known to migrate and he will anchor up. Once the anchor is set the horn signals the start of fishing.

Your fishing rod will have a hook attached to the end of the line. The crew will show you the best way to put the bait that we provide, on the hook. He will instruct you how to pull the line out one count at a time. The line will move a distance away from the boat based on the number of pulls you take. Many times 35 to 55 pulls works for me. I will let the first 20 pulls out somewhat quickly. Then I count very slow pulls. When a fish bites, let it run some and then set the hook. Start reeling and the battle begins. Always remember to keep your thumb on the spool when letting line out. If your thumb is not on the spool when the fish bites, it will pull the line out so quickly you will tangle up into what we call a bird’s nest and it will be difficult to win the battle. Once you set the hook you don't need your thumb there anymore as you reel in your fish.

Once hooked, it is MOST IMPORTANT to keep your fishing line straight out in front of you. For example, you hook up with the blue and see your line at the back of the boat, but you are at the front of the boat. The crew will yell for you to walk to your fish. As you walk toward the back of the boat, watch all the lines form the rods you pass. It is important not to have your line cross other lines. This means you may walk in front of some people and behind others on your way to your hooked fish. The crew will follow and coach. If you do get caught in other lines (called a tangle), the crew will quickly work to get you out of that tangle and you proceed to our fish and continue to reel it in.

Sometimes the fish will keep swimming away and bring you around the entire boat. The best way to win the battle is to keep following the fish. When you see the fish just near the surface, be carefully that the fish stays in the water until the deckhand puts a gaff ( a pole with a sharp hook on it) in it and brings it on the boat. Do not reel anymore. Leave the fish on the top in the water while you wait for the gaff.

Yay! Now put another bait on the hook drop in your line, count those pulls and catch another and another and another