How To Catch Tuna

Aboard Party Boat NJ NJ Party Boat, you will either jig for the fish or fish with bait on a hook.

Bait Fishing For Tuna

After we arrive at the canyon and have anchored up, the crew immediately gets a chum slick going. This slick attracts the tuna fish to the boat. The captain will inform all anglers of the thermocline depth and when fish are spotted on the electronic fish finder, he will announce the depths the fish are located. If squid are spotted swimming near the boat, the crew often nets the squid to keep and use for live bait.

Most often, we use live or frozen squid, butterfish or sardines as bait. Each type of bait is attached to the hook in its own unique way. If you are a novice tuna angler, or if you ask, the crew will show you the best way to put the bait that we provide, on the hook. The crew will also determine that you have the necessary egg weight attached to your line. Once the hook is baited, the crew will assist or instruct you on how to pull the line out, slowly, to the proper depth. With a stronger current, more pulls and often more weights are needed to get to the necessary depth. Our crew is there for the purpose of helping you to catch a tuna. Listen carefully and follow their instructions and please ask for assistance at any time. When time passes and a fish has not taken your hook, reel in slowly, check the bait and proceed to drop your line into the deep blue sea and slowly pull your line out to the proper depth and wait again.

You will know when a fish bites! Let it run for a count of about five seconds, start reeling until the line gets tight and the battle begins! How exciting! Once the fish is hooked, it is MOST IMPORTANT to keep your fishing line straight out and pointed at the fish. For example, the tuna is hooked and see your line at the back of the boat, but you are at the front of the boat. The crew will yell for you to walk to your fish. As you walk toward the back of the boat, watch all the lines form the rods you pass. It is important not to have your line cross other lines. This means you may walk in front of some people and behind others on your way to your hooked fish. The crew will follow and coach. If your line gets caught in other lines (called a tangle), the crew will quickly work to get you out of that tangle and you proceed to your fish and continue to reel it in until the fish is close enough to the boat so the crew can gaff it and bring it on the boat for you. Often times this means walking with your rod pointed at the fish, as the tuna takes you around the boat more than once. Our crew will stay with you and offer all of the assistance you need for the ultimate goal of landing the tuna on the boat. They will show you how to use the boat rail for leverage to make reeling in that sixty or one hundred pound tuna, an easier task. The crew will also check the drag of your line for the proper tension, to prevent the fish from breaking the line. You do not have to be strong when using the rail for leverage. Cindy has caught sixty pound tunas rather easily while using the rail for leverage. Depending on the size of the tuna that you hook, and its craftiness, it can take any where from ten minutes to more than an hour to finally get the fish on the boat!

Wow! You have discovered the thrill and excitement of catching a big tuna! This adventure may leave you exhausted and you may want to take a break, but most likely you will want to put another bait on the hook, drop in your line, count those pulls and catch another and another.

Jigging For Tuna

After we arrive at the canyon and have anchored up, the crew immediately gets a chum slick going. Often times, the tuna are swimming near the surface, attracted by this slick. Most jigging is done when large schools of fish are seen on the scope, because jigging can require much more work than bait fishing. When not accustomed to jigging for tuna, it is best to wait for this most productive time. Anglers who jig for the first time are most successful after observing an experienced angler hook a tuna on a jig. There are many types of jigs available that work well for catching tuna. If you are unsure, talk to Captain Bob before you purchase any. You can always obtain jigs aboard Party Boat NJ or purchase them at local tackle shops.

Now let us begin to jig for that tuna! Captain Bob has just called out the depth where the tuna are seen. You drop your line to the proper depth, generally using counted pulls, and lock your reel. You now make upward swings of the rod tip, and then drop the rod tip so the jig goes deeper, further down into the sea. Continually repeat this action until the fish hits. Most fish hit on the return, as the jig sinks deeper, not as you lift the rod. Be prepared for you will know when a fish bites! Let it run for a count of about five seconds, and then start reeling until the line gets tight and the battle begins! Once the fish is hooked, it is MOST IMPORTANT to keep your fishing line straight out and pointed at the fish. For example, the tuna is hooked and see your line at the back of the boat, but you are at the front of the boat. The crew will yell for you to walk to your fish. As you walk toward the back of the boat, watch all the lines form the rods you pass. It is important not to have your line cross other lines. This means you may walk in front of some people and behind others on your way to your hooked fish. The crew will follow and coach. If your line gets caught in other lines (called a tangle), the crew will quickly work to get you out of that tangle and you proceed to your fish and continue to reel it in until the fish is close enough to the boat so the crew can gaff it and bring it on the boat for you. Often times this means walking with your rod pointed at the fish, as the tuna takes you around the boat more than once. Our crew will stay with you and offer all of the assistance you need for the ultimate goal of landing the tuna on the boat. They will show you how to use the boat rail for leverage to make reeling in that sixty or one hundred pound tuna, an easier task. The crew will also check the drag of your line for the proper tension, to prevent the fish from breaking the line. You do not have to be strong when using the rail for leverage. Cindy has caught sixty pound tunas rather easily while using the rail for leverage. Depending on the size of the tuna that you hook, and its craftiness, it can take any where from ten minutes to more than an hour to finally get the fish on the boat!

Yay! And Wow! You have discovered the thrill and excitement of catching a big tuna! This adventure may leave you exhausted and you may want to take a break, but most likely you will want to put another bait on the hook, drop in your line, count those pulls and catch another and another.